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Authors: Dorie Greenspan

Around My French Table (97 page)

BOOK: Around My French Table
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1
cup sugar
3
tablespoons water
1
tablespoon light corn syrup
¾
cup heavy cream, warm or at room temperature
1
tablespoon unsalted butter, at room temperature
Pinch of salt

Put the sugar, water, and corn syrup in a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan and cook over medium-high heat, swirling the pan occasionally but not stirring, until the caramel turns a medium amber. If any sugar spatters onto the sides of the pan, wipe it down with a pastry brush dipped in cold water. And if you're not sure of the color—it can be difficult to judge color in a pan—put a drop on a white plate.

Lower the heat and, standing away from the pan to avoid sputters and spats, add the cream, butter, and salt. The mixture will bubble furiously, but the bubbles will die down, and when they do, use a wooden spoon or silicone spatula to stir the sauce until it is smooth. Pour into a bowl or heatproof jar—a canning jar is perfect. Cool until just warm before serving.

 

MAKES ABOUT 1 CUP

 

SERVING
The sauce should be served warm. Use it over cakes or ice cream, as a dipping sauce for cookies, or as a side sauce with waffles.

 

STORING
Packed into a jar with a piece of plastic wrap pressed against its surface, the sauce will keep in the refrigerator for at least a month. Before serving, reheat it gently either in a microwave oven on low power or over the lowest heat possible.

Vanilla Ice Cream

T
HINK OF THIS AS PRIMORDIAL ICE CREAM,
the one from which all other ice creams spring. It is a classic recipe built on a base of crème anglaise, and it is this cooked-custard base that defines it as French ice cream. Ice cream that's made without a cooked base is called Philadelphia. Of the two, the richer and creamier one is French—it's the work of those egg yolks.

Don't be afraid of putting a little heat under the custard as you cook it—medium heat is fine—but, most important, don't stop stirring! Also, don't stop cooking until the custard is thick enough for you to run your finger down the bowl of a spoon and have the track stay. While I often use the finger test, I like to take the custard's temperature with an instant-read thermometer.

About the vanilla: You can use either vanilla beans or extract, but no matter what you use, it must be of the best quality. If you use beans, they should be plump, pliable, and very fragrant; split and scrape them and allow them to infuse the hot milk and cream with their flavor—give yourself an extra 30 minutes for this. If you use extract, make sure it's pure and aromatic.

BE PREPARED:
You'll need to freeze the ice cream for at least 2 hours before serving.

2
cups whole milk
2
cups heavy cream
2
plump, moist vanilla beans, split and scraped (see box,
[>]
), or 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
6
large egg yolks
¾
cup sugar

Have a heatproof bowl with a strainer set over it at the ready for the cooked custard.

Bring the milk and cream to a boil in a large heavy-bottomed saucepan. If you're using vanilla beans, toss the seeds and pods into the pan, remove the pan from the heat, cover, and allow the mixture to stand for at least 30 minutes, so that the liquid takes on the vanilla's flavor. At the end of this infusion period, bring the milk and cream back to a boil and remove the vanilla pods (you can use them to make vanilla sugar; see
[>]
). If you're using extract, you'll add it later.

In a medium bowl, whisk the yolks and sugar together until very well blended and just slightly thickened. Whisking without stop, drizzle in about one third of the hot liquid—adding the hot liquid slowly will temper the eggs and keep them from cooking. Once the eggs are acclimatized to the heat, you can whisk in the remaining liquid a little more quickly. Pour the custard back into the pan and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula and making sure to get into the edges of the pan, until the custard thickens slightly and coats the back of the spoon; if you run your finger down the bowl of the spoon, the custard should not run into the track. The custard should reach at least 170 degrees F, but no more than 180 degrees F, on an instant-read thermometer. Immediately remove the pan from the heat and pour the custard through the strainer into the bowl. Stir in the vanilla extract, if you're using it.

The custard needs to chill before you churn it, and while you can put it directly into the fridge, the quickest and easiest way to bring down the temperature is to set the bowl into a larger bowl filled with ice cubes and cold water; stir the custard from time to time as it cools. It's ready to use when it's cold.

Scrape the chilled custard into the bowl of an ice cream maker and churn according to the manufacturer's instructions. Pack the ice cream into an airtight container and freeze it for at least 2 hours, or until it is firm enough to scoop.

 

MAKES ABOUT 1 QUART

 

SERVING
If the ice cream is very firm, allow it to sit on the counter for a few minutes before scooping.

 

STORING
Packed tightly in a covered container, the ice cream will keep in the freezer for about 2 weeks.

Dark Chocolate Ice Cream

I
'D SUGGEST THAT YOU CHOOSE
a really assertive chocolate for this ice cream, since you're mixing it with cream and eggs, which will tone down the flavor, and everything is milder when chilled. As almost all French ice creams are, this one is custard-based, a guarantee that it will be smooth and rich. And since it starts with a ganache, it will be even smoother.

BE PREPARED:
You'll need to freeze the ice cream for at least 2 hours before serving.

6
ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped

cups heavy cream
1
cup whole milk
4
large egg yolks

cup sugar
Pinch of salt

Put the chocolate in a large heatproof bowl. Bring ¾ cup of the cream to a boil. Pour the cream over the chocolate and let it sit for a minute, then, using a silicone spatula or wooden spoon and starting in the center of the mixture, slowly stir the cream into the chocolate.

Have a heatproof bowl with a strainer set over it at the ready for the cooked custard.

Bring the milk and the remaining ¾ cup cream to a boil in a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan.

Meanwhile, in a bowl, whisk the yolks and sugar together until very well blended and just slightly thickened. Whisking without stop, drizzle in about one third of the hot liquid—adding the hot liquid slowly will temper the eggs and keep them from cooking. Once the eggs are acclimatized to the heat, you can whisk in the remaining liquid a little more quickly. Add the salt and pour the custard back into the pan.

Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula and making sure to get into the edges of the pan, until the custard thickens slightly and coats the back of the spoon; if you run your finger down the bowl of the spoon, the custard should not run into the track. The custard should reach at least 170 degrees F, but no more than 180 degrees F, on an instant-read thermometer. Immediately remove the pan from the heat and pour the custard through the strainer into the bowl. Slowly and gently stir the custard into the ganache.

The custard needs to chill before you churn it, and while you can put it directly into the fridge, the quickest and easiest way to bring down the temperature is to set the bowl into a larger bowl filled with ice cubes and cold water; stir the custard from time to time as it cools. It's ready to use when it's cold.

Scrape the chilled custard into the bowl of an ice cream maker and churn according to the manufacturer's instructions. Pack the ice cream into an airtight container and freeze for at least 2 hours, or until it is firm enough to scoop.

 

MAKES ABOUT 1 QUART

 

SERVING
If the ice cream is very firm—and ice cream made with good chocolate can be pretty firm—allow it to sit on the counter for a few minutes before scooping.

 

STORING
Packed tightly in a covered container, the ice cream will keep in the freezer for about 2 weeks.

SOURCES

GENERAL COOKWARE AND BAKEWARE
Everything from silicone spatulas, baking mats, mandolines, and graters to Dutch ovens, skillets, and tagines.

www.amazon.com
www.broadwaypanhandler.com
www.surlatable.com
www.williams-sonoma.com

 

SPECIALIZED BAKEWARE
You can find brioche, financier, madeleine, and coeur a la creme molds at these sites, as well as instant-read thermometers, piping bags and tips, and other small tools and gadgets.

www.amazon.com
www.surlatable.com

 

SPICES: EVERYDAY AND UNUSUAL, AND PEPPERCORNS TOO

www.amazon.com
(piment d'Espelette)
www.kalustyans.com
www.penzeys.com
www.thespicehouse.com

 

FLEUR DE SEL AND OTHER SPECIALTY SALTS

www.amazon.com
www.atthemeadow.com
(salts from around the world)
www.lepicerie.com

 

NUT OILS (WALNUT, HAZELNUT, AND PISTACHIO)

www.amazon.com
(Leblanc oils from France)

 

PRESERVED LEMONS (CITRONS CONFITS)

www.amazon.com
www.kalustyans.com

 

FOIE GRAS, DUCK BREASTS, AND CHORIZO

www.dartagnan.com

 

TRUFFLES AND TRUFFLE OIL

shop.plantin.com

 

CHOCOLATE
These sites carry the full range of high-quality chocolate—white, semisweet, bittersweet, and unsweetened—and cocoa powder too.

www.amazon.com
www.kingarthurflour.com
www.worldwidechocolate.com

 

ALL-BUTTER PUFF PASTRY (DUFOUR)

www.wholefoodsmarket.com

 

EXTRACTS AND SYRUPS

www.amazon.com
(Monin rose syrup)
www.kalustyans.com
(rose syrup)
www.starkaywhite.com
(rose essence)
www.kingarthurflour.com
www.sonomasyrup.com
(excellent vanilla and almond extracts)

 

ALMOND, HAZELNUT, AND CHICKPEA FLOURS

www.amazon.com
www.bobsredmill.com
www.kalustyans.com
www.kingarthurflour.com
www.wholefoodsmarket.com

 

INDEX

A

acorn squash, in spiced squash, fennel, and pear soup,
[>]

[>]

African flavors

tuna and mango ceviche,
[>]

[>]

see also
Moroccan flavors; North African flavors

aígo guído
,
[>]

[>]

aïoli,
[>]

all-white salad, Hélène's,
[>]

[>]

almond(s)

apple tart, crispy, crackly,
[>]

[>]

beggar's linguine,
[>]

[>]

caramel-, custard tart,
[>]

flounder meunière,
[>]

flour, in financiers,
[>]

[>]

flour, in Ispahan loaf cake,
[>]

[>]

orange tart,
[>]

[>]

orange tuiles,
[>]

[>]

Paris-Brest,
[>]

[>]

and poached pear tart,
[>]

Alsatian herb-speckled spaetzle,
[>]

[>]

anchoiade,
[>]

anchovies

anchoiade,
[>]

pissaladière,
[>]

[>]

appetizers,
see
nibbles and hors d'oeuvres; starters and small plates

BOOK: Around My French Table
5.34Mb size Format: txt, pdf, ePub
ads

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