The Seer and the Scribe (38 page)

BOOK: The Seer and the Scribe
11.97Mb size Format: txt, pdf, ePub
ads

22
Scriptorium: The room in medieval monasteries where Scribes would copy by hand, manuscripts.

23
Illuminated: Decorated images in a manuscript, painted in gold, silver, or brilliant colors, often elaborate designs or pictures along borders and letters.

24
Apparition: A supernatural appearance, a ghost.

25
Tonsure: The shaven patch worn by monks on the crown of their heads.

26
Postulations: Theoretical proposals taken for truths.

27
Purgatory: An intermediate state of temporary punishment after death.

28
Codex Benedictus
: The codex was a series of stories about Benedict; his twin sister, Scholastica; and Maur, Benedict's first disciple.

29
Ossarium: A chamber or depository where bones of the dead are kept.

30
Canon Law: The law governing the Holy Roman Catholic church.

31
Carrels: A table with bookshelves often portioned or enclosed for individual study in a library.

32
Cumdachs: An Irish word for a portable wooden book chest or trunk.

33
Facsimile: A forgery or exact copy of an original work.

34
Daily Offices of Prayers: A practice observed at monasteries whereby the monks observe every three hours, or eight times daily, prayer meetings.

35
Crucible: A heat resistant container, like a flask, it can be subjected to extreme temperatures.

36
Compline: One of the daily offices of prayer around 6 p.m.

37
Matins: The darkest hour office of prayer given between 2:30 and 3 a.m.

38
Minstrel: Or Troubadour, were singers who would sing simple ballads or songs, while playing an instrument for entertainment.

39
Lute: A medieval guitar; a stringed musical instrument with a large pear-shaped body and a fretted fingerboard.

40
Wench: A young woman or female servant.

41
Genuflecting: To bend the knee in worship.

42
Vow: A solemn promise or assertion, one by which in this case, Sophie binds herself to an act, service, or condition in respect to the church.

43
Alcove: A small chapel off to one side of the church.

44
Intercede: To act in behalf of another with a view to reconciling all differences.

45
Aspersorium: A holy water bucket, a liturgical implement, often used with a small ornate ball that holds within it a sponge. It is shaken over a gravesite as a way to offer blessings for the recently deceased.

46
Vale in Christo semper memor nostri amen
: A Latin inscription that reads when translated into English:
Farewell in Christ, always mindful of us, Amen
.

47
Cincture: The velvet-waist scarf worn by Abbots.

48
Ascetic: Practicing self-denial for religious reasons.

49
Stole: Is a long narrow rectangular garment, Abbots drape stoles around their necks.

50
Cellarer: The monk responsible for all the food supplies in a monastery.

51
Induction: The formality by which Jutta will be enclosed as an Anchoress at Disibodenberg. It will also involve Hildegard and Hiltrud, who will be enclosed as her spiritual companion and servant.

52
Guest Master: The one who welcomes and sees to the needs of visitors to the monastery. His duty was to receive any strangers and conduct them to the hospice or guest-chambers. The Benedictine principle of hospitality, expressed in chapter 53 of the Rule of St. Benedict reads: “All guests who present themselves are to be welcomed as Christ, for he himself will say: I was a stranger and you welcomed me (Matt 25:35). Proper honor must be shown to all, especially to those who share our faith (Gal 6:10) and to pilgrims.”

53
Rosary: Prayer beads used in saying a Roman Catholic devotion consisting of meditation on sacred mysteries during recitation of Hail Marys.

54
Knights of Hospitaller: Brotherhood of St. John of Jerusalem. This military religious order of monks founded by Blessed Gérard thought of the hospital as a community of saints: the brothers extended God's loving care to the needy.

55
Aramaic: The Arameans, ancient people of Near East who inhabited Palestine and Syria, speak the Aramaic language, a Semitic language closely related to Hebrew dating as far back as 900 B.C.

56
Investiture: The act of ratifying or establishing in office, a confirmation of the King's right to be King.

57
Prime: The Office of Prayer around 7:30 a.m., shortly after daybreak.

58
All Saints Day: In the Catholic traditions, this was the night when all the spirits who dutifully served their time in Purgatory could finally seek passage into heaven.

59
Incluse: An arcane term used to distinguish between recluses in a more social setting such as a city church and incluses, Anchoresses tied to a monastery and under the rule of an Abbot.

60
Rosemary: Represents faithfulness, love and remembrance. Rosemary is usually symbolic of feminine love because the herb is very tough and strong, and grows very slowly. It is also the symbol for prudence and sensibility.

61
Sage: Symbolic of strength.

62
Lavender: Possesses a strong aroma and is thought to curb many evil things and because of it, malign spirits are terrified.

63
Codices: A bound booklet, or small journal.

64
Sacristy: A room in a church where sacred vessels and vestments are kept or meetings are held sometimes referred to as the Vestry.

65
Chancel: The part of the church including the altar and choir.

66
Confirma hoc Deus
: In English, it requests like a refrain, “Confirm in us, O God.” in part taken from Psalms 68.

67
Collects: Short prayers comprising an invocation, petition, and conclusion.

68
Mass: A sequence of prayers and ceremonies forming the Eucharistic office of the Roman Catholic Church.

69
Eucharist: Communion, a Christian sacrament in which bread and wine are partaken of as the body and blood of the crucified Christ, in remembrance of His supreme sacrifice.

70
Biers: A stand or pallet bearing a coffin or corpse.

71
Censer: A vessel for burning incense in a religious ritual.

72
Rule of St. Benedict: A set of rules which governed medieval monastic life, the main ones include: chastity, poverty and obedience.

73
Psaltery: A stringed-musical instrument, an ancient harp that may be plucked or played with a plectrum or pick.

74
Porter: The gatekeeper at the monastery.

75
Nave: The central part of the church running lengthwise.

76
Forecourt: The front entrance to the church.

77
Scimitar: A curved sword used by Arabs.

78
Retrochoir: Situated behind the monks' choir, this was the area for the elder brothers who weren't expected to follow the rigid routines of the community.

79
Nones: Office of Prayers said between 2 to 3 p.m.

80
Amo, amas
,
amat, amamos, amatis, amant
: Latin conjugations for “I love, you love, he loves, we love, you love, they love.”

81
Vexilla Regis Prodeunt
: Ancient Roman hymn to the True Cross of Christ dating back to the 6th Century.

82
“O hail the cross, our only hope, in this Passiontide! Grant increase of grace to believers, and remove the sins of the guilty.”

83
Compline: The Office of Prayers said around 6 p.m.

84
Opus Dei:
A musical composition in Latin sung in praise of our Holy Father.

85
Precentor: A leader in the reading of the scripture.

86
Apiary: A location where the Apiarist, the beekeeper, works to collect honey and beeswax for making candles.

87
Prie-dieu: A small prayer desk he used for his own private devotionals.

88
Matins: The Office of prayers said at 3 a.m.

89
Magistrate: An official entrusted with administration of the laws.

90
Burghers: Prominent townspeople, like the wealthy merchants and landowners.

91
Ruse: A wily trick.

92
Banshees: Female spirits in Gaelic folklore whose wailing warns a family of an approaching death.

93
Capon: Roasted rooster, considered a delicacy at the time.

94
Pater Nosters
: Latin for “Our Father” used in liturgical daily prayers.

95
Adam's Curse: “And to the man He said, ‘Because you have listened to the voice of your wife you have eaten of the tree about which I commanded you, saying, you shall not eat from it, cursed shall be the ground because of you; in sorrow you shall eat of it all the days of your life. And thorns and thistles it shall bring forth for you, and you shall eat the plant of the field. By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread until you return to the ground; for out of it you have been taken; for dust you are, and to dust you shall return.'” (Genesis 3:17-19)

BOOK: The Seer and the Scribe
11.97Mb size Format: txt, pdf, ePub
ads

Other books

Lyndley by Renee, K.
A Step of Faith by Richard Paul Evans
The desperate hours, a novel by Hayes, Joseph, 1918-2006
The Salzburg Connection by Helen MacInnes
Sleeping with the Fishes by Mary Janice Davidson
The Labyrinth of Destiny by Callie Kanno
Almost Famous Women by Megan Mayhew Bergman