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Authors: Robert Ludlum

The Gemini Contenders

BOOK: The Gemini Contenders
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HOLY BLOOD

Dawn came over the waters of Lago Maggiore. They were on the Stresa freight barge. Petride wondered what would greet them in Milan, although he realized that it did not matter.

Nothing mattered now. The journey was coming to an end.

The holy thing was in its resting place. Not to be unearthed for years; perhaps to be buried for a millennium. There was no way to tell.

They sped southeast on the main track through Varese into Castiglione. The countryside rushed by, and the skyline of Milan came into view.

“We’re here!” shouted Annaxas. “A day’s rest, then home! I must say you people are remarkable!”

“Yes,” said Petride simply. “We’re remarkable.”

The priest of Xenope removed the large Italian pistol from under his shirt. He took two steps forward, toward his beloved brother, and raised the barrel of the weapon. It was inches from the base of Annaxas’s skull.

He pulled the trigger.

THE GEMINI CONTENDERS

“TREMENDOUS SUSPENSE.”


San Francisco Sunday Examiner & Chronicle

“A MASTERLY JOB … COMPLEX, THOUGHT PROVOKING, AND INTRICATELY PLOTTED.”


San Diego Union

Bantam Books by Robert Ludlum
Ask your bookseller for the books you have missed

THE APOCALYPSE WATCH

THE AQUITAINE PROGRESSION

THE BOURNE IDENTITY

THE BOURNE SUPREMACY

THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM

THE CHANCELLOR MANUSCRIPT

THE CRY OF THE HALIDON

THE GEMINI CONTENDERS

THE HOLCROFT COVENANT

THE ICARUS AGENDA

THE MATARESE CIRCLE

THE MATARESE COUNTDOWN

THE MATLOCK PAPER

THE OSTERMAN WEEKEND

THE PARSIFAL MOSAIC

THE RHINEMANN EXCHANGE

THE ROAD TO GANDOLFO

THE ROAD TO OMAHA

THE SCARLATTI INHERITANCE

THE SCORPIO ILLUSION

TREVAYNE

THE GEMINI CONTENDERS
A Bantam Book/published by arrangement with the author

PUBLISHING HISTORY
Doubleday edition published 1976
Bantam edition/August 1989

Excerpt from “Trevayne” copyright © 1973 by Jonathan Ryder
.

All rights reserved
.
Copyright © 1976 by Robert Ludlum
.
No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. For information address: Bantam Books
.

eISBN: 978-0-307-81383-1

Bantam Books are published by Bantam Books, a division of Random House, Inc. Its trademark, consisting of the words “Bantam Books” and the portrayal of a rooster, is Registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. Marca Registrada. Bantam Books. New York, New York.

v3.1_r2

For Richard Marek, Editor.

Brilliance cloaked in great humor. Perception beyond any writer’s imagination. Simply, the best there is
.

And for lovely Margot, who makes it all perfect
.

Contents
BOOK ONE
PROLOGUE
DECEMBER 9, 1939
SALONIKA, GREECE

One by one the trucks struggled up the steep road in the predawn light of Salonika. Each went a bit faster at the top; the drivers were anxious to return to the darkness of the descending country road cut out of the surrounding forests.

Yet each of the five drivers in the five trucks had to control his anxiety. None could allow his foot to slip from a brake or press an accelerator beyond a certain point; eyes had to be squinted, sharpening the focus, alert for a sudden stop or an unexpected curve in the darkness.

For it was darkness. No headlights were turned on; the column traveled with only the gray light of the Grecian night, low-flying clouds filtering the spill of the Grecian moon.

The journey was an exercise in discipline. And discipline was not foreign to these drivers, or to the riders beside the drivers.

Each was a priest. A monk. From the Order of Xenope, the harshest monastic brotherhood under the control of the Patriarchate of Constantine. Blind obedience coexisted with self-reliance; they were disciplined to the instant of death.

In the lead truck, the young bearded priest removed his cassock, under which were the clothes of a laborer, a heavy shirt and trousers of thick fabric. He rolled up the cassock and placed it in the well behind the high-backed seat, shoving it down between odd items of canvas and cloth. He spoke to the robed driver beside him.

“It’s no more than a half mile now. The stretch of track parallels the road for about three hundred feet. In the open; it will be sufficient.”

“The train will be there?” asked the middle-aged, powerfully built monk, narrowing his eyes in the darkness.

“Yes. Four freight cars, a single engineer. No stokers. No other men.”

“You’ll be using a shovel, then,” said the older priest, smiling but with no humor in his eyes.

“I’ll be using the shovel,” replied the younger man simply. “Where’s the weapon?”

“In the glove compartment.”

The priest in the laborer’s clothes reached forward and released the catch on the compartment panel. It fell open. He put his hand inside the recess and withdrew a heavy, large-calibered pistol. Deftly, the priest sprung the magazine out of the handle, checked the ammunition, and cracked the thick steel back into the chamber. The metallic sound had a finality to it.

“A powerful instrument. Italian, isn’t it?”

“Yes,” answered the older priest without comment, only the sadness in his voice.

“That’s appropriate. And, I suppose, a blessing.” The younger man shoved the weapon into his belt. “You’ll call his family?”

“I’ve been so ordered—” It was obvious that the driver wanted to say something more, but he controlled himself. Silently he gripped the wheel more firmly than necessary.

For a moment the moonlight broke through the night clouds, illuminating the road cut out of the forest.

“I used to play here as a child,” said the younger man. “I would run through the woods and get wet in the streams … then I would dry off in the mountain caves and pretend I had visions. I was happy in these hills. The Lord God wanted me to see them again. He is merciful. And kind.”

The moon disappeared. There was darkness once more.

The trucks entered a sweeping curve to the west; the woods thinned out and in the distance, barely visible, were the outlines of telegraph poles, black shafts silhouetted against gray night. The road straightened and widened and became one with a clearing that stretched perhaps a hundred yards from forest to forest. A flat, barren area imposed on the myriad hills and woodlands. In the center of
the clearing, its hulk obscured by the darkness beyond, was a train.

Immobile but not without movement. From the engine came curls of smoke spiraling up into the night.

“In the old days,” said the young priest, “the farmers would herd their sheep and cart their produce here. There was always a great deal of confusion, my father told me. Fights broke out constantly over what belonged to whom. They were amusing stories.… There he is!”

The beam of a flashlight shot out from the black. It circled twice and then remained stationary, the white shaft directed now at the last freight car. The priest in laborer’s clothes unclipped a pencil light from his shirt pocket, held it forward and pressed the button for precisely two seconds. The reflection off the truck’s windshield briefly illuminated the small enclosure. The younger man’s eyes were drawn swiftly to the face of his brother monk. He saw that his companion had bitten his lip; a rivulet of blood trickled down his chin, matting itself in the close-cropped gray beard.

There was no reason to comment on it.

“Pull up to the third car. The others will turn around and start unloading.”

“I know,” said the driver simply. He swung the wheel gently to the right and headed toward the third freight car.

The engineer, in overalls and a goatskin cap, approached the truck as the young priest opened the door and jumped to the ground. The two men looked at each other and then embraced.

“You look different without your cassock, Petride. I’d forgotten how you looked—”

“Oh, come now. Four years out of twenty-seven is hardly the better part.”

“We don’t see you often enough. Everyone in the family remarks about it.” The engineer removed his large, calloused hands from the priest’s shoulders. The moon broke through the clouds again; the spill lighted the trainman’s face. It was a strong face, nearer fifty than forty, filled with the lines of a man constantly exposing his skin to the wind and the sun.

“How’s mother, Annaxas?”

“Well. A little weaker with each month of age, but alert.”

“And your wife?”

“Pregnant again and not laughing this time. She scolds me.”

“She should. You’re a lustful old dog, my brother. But better to serve the church, I rejoice to say.” The priest laughed.

“I’ll tell her you said that,” said the engineer, smiling.

There was a moment of silence before the young man replied. “Yes. You tell her.” He turned to the activity taking place at the freight cars. The loading doors had been opened and lanterns hung inside, shedding their muted light sufficiently for packing, but not bright enough to be obvious outside. The figures of robed priests began walking swiftly back and forth between the trucks and the doors, carrying crates, boxes of heavy cardboard framed with wood. Prominently displayed on each crate was the crucifix and thorns of the Order of Xenope.

“The food?” inquired the engineer.

“Yes,” answered his brother. “Fruits, vegetables, dried meats, grain. The border patrols will be satisfied.”

“Then where?” It was not necessary to be clearer.

“This vehicle. In the middle section of the carriage, beneath tobacco nets. You have the lookouts posted?”

“On the tracks and the road; both directions for over a mile. Don’t worry. Before daybreak on a Sunday morning, only you priests and novices have work to do and places to go.”

The young priest glanced over at the fourth freight car. The work was progressing rapidly; the crates were being stacked inside. All those hours of practice were showing their value. The monk who was his driver stopped briefly by the muted light of the loading door, a carton in his hands. He exchanged looks with the younger man, then forced his attention away, back to the carton which he swung up into the well of the freight car.

BOOK: The Gemini Contenders
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