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Authors: Ian Rankin

The Complaints

BOOK: The Complaints
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Table of Contents
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Critical acclaim for Ian Rankin
 
DOORS OPEN
 
‘Because Rankin is a master story-teller, that means the reader is quickly swept up and carried along. I read this in one sitting, on a swelteringly hot beach in Greece; I kept meaning to do other things - find a beer, fetch a sunhat, check the BlackBerry - but somehow had to keep putting them off until I finished this chapter; and then the next; until I’d reached the end.’
Guardian
 

Doors Open
is a lot of fun. It’s pacy, witty, full of action, twists and splendid dialogue. And Rebus does make a subtle appearance when an officer describes his police station as “a damn sight quieter since you-know-who retired.”’
The Times
 
‘An immensely satisfying, bloody and constantly surprising story of middle-class amateurs mixing it with the big boys. And, as usual, Edinburgh - “a village masquerading as a city” - is a character in itself. So much so that “you-know-who” is hardly missed!’
Evening Standard
 
‘Ian Rankin can pull off an audacious criminal caper even without his trademark detective.’
Scotland on Sunday
 
‘Rankin is enjoying himself here examining the flipside of Rebus’ world: the mindset of the criminal attempting the perfect crime. The plotting and suspense are as impeccable as ever, and his ear for dialogue and insight into his home city remain perfectly honed. Freed from his Rebus back-story, Rankin sets a rattling pace, and
Doors Open
is an untrammelled joy to read.’
The List
 
‘Rankin has produced another stunningly clever plot, and peopled it with convincingly intriguing characters. Can this man do no wrong?’
Daily Mail
 
‘Now Rankin has retired Rebus he can use his considerable talents to create standalone titles like this.’
The Independent
EXIT MUSIC
 
‘Rankin has an unparalleled ability to draw in the reader and make us feel every knock and setback in Inspector Rebus’s red-raw life. Rarely has that talent been better displayed than in
Exit Music
which sees the flawed but redeemingly honest central character staggering towards the finishing line of an inglorious career that has utterly defined his life.’
Scotland on Sunday
 
‘The main theme of the book is civic corruption by the power of money, money from whatever source. Always up to the minute, Rankin has Russian oligarchs or something similar lurking on the streets of Edinburgh and the murder of a Russian poet is directly counterpointed to the death throes of the real life Russian, Litvinenko . . . As Rankin percipiently observes, the problem is the overworld not the underworld - words which might well sum up the philosophy of Rankin’s whole oeuvre.’
The Spectator
 
‘The last scene bringing together Rebus and Cafferty, is a sly, ingenious reworking of Holmes’s apparently fatal tussle with Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls - another Scottish author attempting to retire his detective but failing, you can’t help but notice. The possibility of Rebus returning is conspicuously left open.’
Sunday Times
 
‘The title
Exit Music
serves a dual meaning - not just Rebus’s exit from the police but also the possibility of Scotland’s wishing to leave the Union with England after the recent election results ...
Exit Music
is a fitting end to the career of one of the most beguiling characters in the history of crime fiction - not because the lowering of the final curtain finds the audience satisfied but because it leaves them gasping for more.’
The Times
 
‘It would, of course, be criminally bad form to reveal the precise manner of John Rebus’s final exit - but I think most readers will find the music more or less note-perfect.’
Daily Mail
 
THE NAMING OF THE DEAD
 
‘Masterly . . . Ian Rankin’s finest novel. It is more than a crime novel, or rather, Rankin’s achievement is to show, convincingly, how crime permeates society.’
Scotsman
 
‘Rebus may seem to be running on something very near empty, but there is no sign that Rankin has lost any of the energy to continue this consistently impressive series.’
Sunday Times
 
‘Rankin deftly inserts Rebus into the true story of that week, culminating, as it did, in the London bombings of July 7. An excellent performance, for a cop on the verge of extinction.’ Marcel Berlins,
The Times
 
‘Politics crashes head on into Inspector Rebus’s usual interests (solving grisly murders and supping pints) in the latest of this award-winning series.
The Naming of the Dead
, set against the 2005 G8 Summit, is yet another irresistible page-turner from the UK’s best crime novelist.’
Mail on Sunday
 
‘The plot is another Rankin corker, complex yet convincing, and played out on this occasion over only nine days against the backdrop of last year’s G8 summit at Gleneagles, with its retinue of concerts and marches against poverty . . . The best crime novel you’ll read this year.’
Sunday Telegraph
 
 
FLESHMARKET CLOSE
 
‘Rankin’s best novel yet and that’s saying something.’
Observer
 
‘As always, Rankin proves himself the master of his own milieu. He brings the dark underside of Edinburgh deliciously to life . . . Rankin never puts a foot wrong.’
Daily Mail
 
‘Rankin at his best, recalling Dickens both in the vigour and ambition of their social portraiture and in their campaigning thrust.’
Sunday Times
 
‘No one writes more gripping stories than Rankin; his imagination peoples Edinburgh the way Balzac’s fantasy did Paris. The scenes which emerge . . . are the product of a troubling imagination and a probing intellect which uses the crime genre to examine aspects of life, especially contemporary Scottish life, that politicians prefer to ignore.’
Times Literary Supplement
 
‘Another year and another surefire bestseller for Britain’s No.1 crime writer, Ian Rankin.’
Daily Mirror
 
‘Ironic, exciting and immediate. The plot is resourceful; characterisation sharp; humour as unexpected as a rug jerked from under your feet. Despite the wear and tear, Rebus has never looked in better shape; a long, long way, I’d have thought, from retirement.’
Literary Review
A QUESTION OF BLOOD
 
‘He writes with a natural rhythm which exerts an almost hypnotic effect.’
Independent
 
‘Exemplifies the enhanced craftsmanship of the author’s recent work; the sheer number of handicaps Rebus overcomes and of the puzzles he solves evinces a relishable virtuosity.’
Sunday Times
 
‘A rich absorbing narrative in which the focus is not on who did it - that we know - but why. Artful, moving and entertaining.’
Observer
‘An exceptionally well-plotted book, which is guaranteed to hook you and keep you hooked.’
Sunday Telegraph
 
‘Recent crime writers . . . have at their disposal all the openings for alienation afforded by the modern world - and, if one of them has to be singled out as being especially attuned to contemporary murder and social malaise, it is Ian Rankin.’
Times Literary Supplement
 
 
RESURRECTION MEN
 
‘What is impressive in
Resurrection Men
is not just the deftness of the links between disparate crimes, but the fluency of the fugue-like counterpoint between investigations . . . On this form, nothing is beyond him.’
Sunday Times
 
‘Rankin’s Rebus novels should be required reading for anyone whose knowledge of Edinburgh has been derived from visits to the festival . . . Rankin conveys the visceral fears and hatreds lurking just below the smart Georgian surface of the “you’ll have your tea” New Town.’
Sunday Telegraph
 
‘Bears all the qualities that have established Rankin as one of Britain’s leading novelists in any genre: a powerful sense of place; a redefinition of Scotland and its past; persuasive characters and a growing compassion among its characters.’
New Statesman
THE FALLS
 
‘Rankin masterfully pulls his fascinating plot together, and his sense of place casts a powerful shadow over this subtle tale of the recurrence of evil.’
Guardian
BOOK: The Complaints
11.14Mb size Format: txt, pdf, ePub
ads

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