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Authors: Stephanie Laurens,Victoria Alexander,Rachel Gibson

Secrets of a Perfect Night

BOOK: Secrets of a Perfect Night
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S
TEPHANIE
L
AURENS
V
ICTORIA
A
LEXANDER
R
ACHEL
G
IBSON

Secrets of a Perfect Night

Contents

Stephanie Laurens

SCANDALOUS LORD DERE

O
NE
After the Cavendish-Mayhews’ New Year’s Eve ball, Adrian Andrew…
T
WO
The rattle of a log in the grate woke Adrian.
T
HREE
How—in what way—had she lied?
F
OUR
He flung open the door of Abby’s room so violently…
F
IVE
No power on earth will induce me to marry Adrian…

Victoria Alexander

THE LAST LOVE LETTER

O
NE
Lady Rachael Norcross surveyed the crowded ballroom before her and…
T
WO
Lady Bradbourne’s ball was as exciting as Rachael had imagined…
T
HREE
Where is he?
F
OUR
Nothing had changed. Jason gazed across the ballroom with a…
F
IVE
“My lord, you have a visitor.” Mayfield’s voice sounded from…
S
IX
With every minute and every dance and every pleasant conversation…
S
EVEN
“My lady, Mr.—er—Lord Lyndhurst is here,” Mayfield announced…
E
IGHT
Had any one meal ever stretched so endlessly?
N
INE
If she really wanted time, he certainly was giving it…
T
EN
“Lord Lyndhurst has left, my lady.”

Rachel Gibson

NOW AND FOREVER

O
NE
Brina McConnell Slid her feet into a pair of five-inch…
T
WO
Brina studied Thomas’s serious blue eyes and tilted her head.
T
HREE
Brina woke the next morning feeling as tired as when…
F
OUR
Brina listened as Thomas told her about how he’d started…
F
IVE
Brina squinted through the darkness to the clock next to…
S
IX
Thomas bent at the knees and swung her into his…

 

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

PRAISE

DON’T MISS

COPYRIGHT

ABOUT THE PUBLISHER

Scandalous Lord Dere

Stephanie Laurens

One

New Year’s Day, 1823

A
FTER THE
C
AVENDISH
-M
AYHEWS
’ New Year’s Eve ball, Adrian Andrew Hawsley, sixth Viscount Dere, swore off women. He had had enough—figuratively and literally.

Slowing his blacks for a turn, Adrian drew in the chill air, then exhaled; his breath misted instantly.

“There ’tis.” From his perch behind him, his tiger, Bolt, a grizzled veteran, pointed to a sign.

Adrian nodded. Although it was past midday, the grip of the early morning freeze had yet to slacken; he kept his horses to a wary trot as he set the curricle down the road to the southwest.

Despite the weather, he was determined to press on. With every mile that passed he felt better, as if a vise locked about his lungs for so long he’d forgotten it was there were finally easing open, as if a weight he’d forgotten he was carrying on his shoulders were lifting away.

By the end of last night’s ball, he’d been fed up—overwhelmingly bored and not a little disgusted. If a
crown existed for the premier lover in the ton, he could probably legitimately claim it—indeed, it would very likely be offered to him on a purple silk pillow. Discretion, absolute and inviolate, might have been his watchword for years; despite that, the ton had learned enough to form its own opinion of his prowess, his expertise. Much of the gossip was true, which left him with little doubt as to the sources of the information. As a result, a competition had developed with ladies vying to see who next could command his highly regarded attentions. Over the past few years, he had never lacked for invitations to ladies’ beds.

Bad enough. The Cavendish-Mayhews’ ball had been worse.

Ladies of amorous intent had surrounded him until he’d felt hunted. He did not appreciate the inversion of roles—as far as he was concerned, he was the hunter,
they
should be the prey. These days that wasn’t how it was. Two sorts of women lay in wait to ambush him—most were married ladies whose only interest was in trying out his paces so that they could say they, too, had partaken of the latest acclaimed experience. Such mesdames jostled check by jowl with unmarried ladies plotting his matrimonial downfall, their calculating eyes fixed on his title and burgeoning wealth rather than on his more personal talents.

He didn’t know which he disliked more. He’d felt like a fox cornered by slavering hounds.

Enough.
More
than enough. It was time to take charge of his life and steer it…into deeper waters.

He uttered a short laugh. The superficiality of his life
did indeed grate. He was thirty today—it was his birthday. What had he thus far accomplished in his life? Nothing. Where was his life headed? He didn’t know, but he was determined to set his wheels on a different road.

At present his curricle’s wheels were rolling down the road to Exeter. He’d left the Cavendish-Mayhews’ mansion outside Glastonbury early that morning while all the bejeweled ladies were still snug in their beds. None had shared his, which fact had caused no little confusion and even some annoyance. He was there, wasn’t he? They expected him to perform, to live up to his scandalous reputation, all for their amusement. The ton, as he well knew, could be a demanding world. They could demand all they liked—he was no longer interested in playing their games.

Around him the countryside lay silent, a dappled world of dark browns and white, the bare branches of trees and the patches of cold earth contrasting against the light covering of snow. There was more on the way, but he knew whither he was headed, knew the road like the back of his hand.

He was going home.

He hadn’t been back to Bellevere since burying his father nearly seven years before. His childhood home was like a ghost to him now, all the warm, happy memories overlaid by the acrimony and dissension of his father’s last years. His wildness was not something his father had understood, nor been able to counter; his sire’s vain attempts at forcing his only son to toe his line had met with resistance and led to estrangement. Now he could admit that he regretted that break as bitterly as he’d at
one time resented his father’s wish to tame him. To change him. His father had failed, but so, too, had he. Bellevere had represented that failure; he’d closed the house, turned his back on it, and left it—his principal estate and ancestral home—to decay.

It was time to go back. Time to rebuild. To pick up the shattered pieces of that earlier life and start again.

And see what he could make of it this time.

He’d accepted the Cavendish-Mayhews’ invitation out of all those sent him for the simple reason that their house had been a perfect staging post for his drive down to Dartmoor. From the first, he’d intended heading west when he left; he hadn’t, however, expected to leave today—the day after the ball, the first day of the year.

Then again, what better day to make a fresh start, with a whole new year stretching ahead of him? And it was his birthday as well—the first day of his fourth decade; he could only hope it would prove more fulfilling than the last. His mind full of memories, of prospects and plans, he drove on.

Exeter was an hour behind them, the long climb up to the moor at their backs, when Bolt leaned close to shout over the whipping wind, “Don’t like the look of that up ahead.”

His gaze fixed between his leader’s ears, Adrian hadn’t been watching. Now he lifted his gaze, and swore beneath his breath. Leaden clouds puffed and swelled and rolled toward them, blotting out the horizon. Beyond, all the sky was that same ghostly gray-white hue. Both Adrian and Bolt had been born and
raised on Dartmoor; they both knew what they were facing.

“Damn!” Adrian’s mind raced. They’d already turned into the lane to Widecombe, the small village beyond which Bellevere stood. They were equidistant from four small villages with no other shelter near. “Nothing for it—we’ll have to go on.”

“Aye.” Bolt huddled in Adrian’s wind-shadow. “That, and pray.”

They did pray, both of them. They knew how treacherous the moor could be, especially in winter. Snow started to fall, then thickened; the wind rose, swirling the flakes, making it harder to pick out the road. As the clouds lowered, the temperature dropped. The light started to fade.

Adrian concentrated on keeping the blacks plodding steadily, concentrated on keeping them on the road, all the while squinting through the whirling white, searching for landmarks to guide him. The cold intensified. Even through his thick greatcoat, he could feel the icy fingers of the wind. He wore no hat; snow covered his hair—he was almost grateful it was cold enough to freeze.

They would die if they didn’t reach shelter. The nearest roof of any sort belonged to Mallard Cottage on the outskirts of Widecombe, still more than a mile away over an exposed ridge. The horses had slowed to a crawl; the temptation to push them on grew, but Adrian knew better than to give in to it. If he missed the road, they’d end in a drift and perish for certain. Their only hope was to keep doggedly on—and pray.

When the ridge finally ended and they found themselves at the top of a white slope with the roofs of Widecombe-in-the-moor dotting the opposite rise, just discernible through the falling snow, Adrian allowed himself a sigh of relief. Looking down the slope, he could see a pair of parallel ridges—the low stone walls bordering the lane, a white ribbon leading to safety. All they had to do was follow it.

It would be safer to walk, but his hands, even in leather gloves, were all but frozen to the reins. The reins themselves were heavy with icing snow. The horses were growing weaker every minute he dallied. And Bolt had stopped talking long ago. Dragging in a short breath, Adrian eased the horses onto the downward slope.

Their hooves were freshly filed. Both horses were well broken and experienced. He held them steady and let them pick their way down, one hand on the brake, ready to slam it on if need arose. Every foot seemed a mile, every yard an eternity, but they slowly descended without mishap.

BOOK: Secrets of a Perfect Night
5.72Mb size Format: txt, pdf, ePub
ads

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